90 Days Later: Video Player Bidding Best Practices

Video Player Bidding helps you maximize monetization, provided you’re following these recommendations

After the launch of Video Player Bidding earlier this year, we’ve seen great adoption and some impressive  benefits, including faster time-to-first-frame for ads and a great supplemental boost of ad demand for publishers’ ad stacks. As with any great new product comes great learning experiences. With months of data and the associated on-going analysis, our goal is to educate our customers on best practices to optimize Video Player Bidding setups to maximize revenue potential.

 

 

If you’re unfamiliar with Video Player Bidding (an easy-to-implement version of video header bidding) check out our previous blog post or the great video below of JW Player cofounder Brian Rifkin and SpotX Chief Revenue Officer Sean Buckley discussing the solution, and look here for how to get started.

 

In the last three months, the data we’ve collected from Video Player Bidding has proven a few core advertising concepts we’ve recommended in other blog posts we’ve posted.

Know Your Setup

If nothing else, we’ve realized that many publishers are unclear as to the optimal player setup for their page layout and audience. This is a perfect time to do some analysis and introduce improvements and efficiencies.

 

  • Cloud-hosted vs Self-hosted

For cloud-hosted Players, we’d be remiss to not note that a publisher using a custom JavaScript embed will override any advertising settings put into the dashboard. This includes an advertising block in the Player’s JS setup.

For self-hosted Players, simply set up the advertising block with the “bids” block described in our documentation and examples.

 

  • Custom Header Bidding Solutions

We’ve found that many publishers have pre-existing header bidding solutions in place. This can present an issue with event timing depending on the implementation. Typically, the best solution is to provide the Player with a complete and finalized ad tag prior to setting up the Player. This allows publishers to take advantage of the efficiencies built into the Player’s ad scheduling functionality.

 

The example below describes how to get your custom bidding done and then set up the Player with the appropriate information so as to avoid any timing issues.

 

// Do your custom header bidding here, which should result in a created ad tag

 

var finalTag = baseTag + custParams

 

// Once you’ve built your ad tag with the appropriate key value pairs from your header bidding solution, you can set up the player

 

var playerInstance = jwplayer(“myElement”)

playerInstance.setup({

   “file”: “myVideo”,

   “advertising”: {

       “client”: “googima”,

       “schedule”: {

           “adBreak”: {

               “tag”: “finalTag”,    —— the tag supplied here is a variable, created above prior to player setup

               “offset”: “pre”

           }

       },

       “bids”: {

           “settings”: {

               “mediationLayerAdServer”: “dfp”,

           },

           “bidders”: [

               {

                   “name”: “SpotX”,

                   “id”: “85394”

               }

           ]

       }

   }

});

 

Note in this scenario, the use of the playAd API is not necessary.

 

  • Player and Site Considerations

In general we’ve found certain player setup attributes to perform better or worse with Video Player Bidding.

 

    1. Player size: Believe it or not, Video Player Bidding requires a player height and width on setup. Advertisers want to know the size and type of player their ads will be running on. We’ve found a fairly large number of publishers who are setting up the Player with null, undefined, or 0 height and width, thus giving the Player a formal size too late. This is one of the largest causes of player setup-related failures.
    2. Click-to-play vs ‘autostart:viewable’ vs autostart in view: Given the extra calls that need to be made for the bidding process, allowing the Player more time to set up and for the bidding process to complete increases the chance of success. Autostart in view typically leads to timing issues with all the other network calls on the page, so be prepared for a degradation in performance in this scenario.
    3. Multiple players on a single page: This is generally discouraged even outside of Video Player Bidding. With multiple players, it can lead to extra network requests from both the Player and the bidding process.
    4. Multiple bidding requests: Video Player Bidding is optimized for single prerolls. Bidding for multiple ad breaks, including 3+ midrolls, is not optimal due to the additional network requests it creates.

 

Mediation Options

Video Player Bidding offers multiple mediation options, each tailored to a specific publisher use case.

 

  • JW Player

This is the easiest way to get started with VPB — no additional line items are required in the Ad Server and is the most performant. If the bidder meets the static floor price, then the bidder wins. Otherwise, the Player uses the fallback tag defined in the corresponding ad break slot. Please ensure the floor in SpotX is set at or above the floor in JW.

 

The downside is the JW mediation option is not aware of any other campaigns (including direct sold) so these campaigns can be cannibalized for programmatic/header traffic. Additionally, as the floor price is static, the bidder may over/under bid for that request.

 

  • DFP

With this option, DFP determines the winner in that the bidder competes directly with DFP line items. Corresponding line items are needed in DFP.  SpotX can help with the setup of the corresponding items.

 

In this instance, please ensure that you are competing all demand in Price Priority. Competing Sponsorships and Standard line items in DFP above JWP priority will largely negate the benefits of the JWP integration. Expect very low revenue from the integration if VPB is run at a lower priority than traditional demand in DFP.

 

The downside of this mediation layer is the ads’ time-to-first-frame will be longer as the Player has to send the SpotX bid to DFP to determine the winner.

 

  • JW Player + DFP

This mediation option combines the JW Player and DFP mediation layers in that order. If the floor price isn’t beaten, the key value pairs are added to the DFP tag to compete against DFP line items. This is a good option for publishers who use DFP but want to take advantage of the performance benefits of JW Player mediation. Please ensure the floor in SpotX is set at or above the floor in JW.

 

  • SpotX

You should select this option if your primary Ad Server is SpotX. All Publisher Direct Sold demand should be run in the SpotX ad server, competing along with the Open Marketplace, allowing full control over priorities given to SpotX demand versus Publisher Sourced Demand.

 

Performance Expectations

Depending on the complexities of your setup as well as how your traffic is split between desktop and mobile, performance expectations should be managed. In short, an autostart player on a page with a large amount of other network calls on a mobile device is not optimal for Video Player Bidding.

We’re Happy to Help

We recognize that both normal Player setups and Video Player Bidding setups can be complicated, especially given your other systems and requirements.

 

For more information about improving your monetization with Video Player Bidding, schedule time to speak with a video expert.

 

Contact Us

CONTACT US

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Ad Preloading in the Buffer-Free Player

JW Player loads ads ahead of user-initiated playback so prerolls are ready to go when videos begin

At our annual JW Insights conference, we announced the final piece of the story that makes up the Buffer-Free Player—ad preloading. Since the first part of the story was released back in JW 7.2, we want to take a moment to remind you of everything that goes into reducing buffering. Understanding fully how it works is key to ensuring your player is optimized for improved user engagement and monetization.

 

“Speed is the bedrock of video experience success” —Bill Day, COO, JW Player, at JW Insights 2018

 

Speed is always top of mind when building features for the player. JW8 had a core mission around speed and in the months since release has proven to perform well in all environments, including those with many network requests or low bandwidth.

To recap the story of what it means to have a Buffer-Free Player, we can start by noting that preloading video content has been supported in JW Player for a long time. When there is no preroll ad, content can be preloaded before a user initiates playback to reduce the buffering time.

However, if there is a preroll ad, preloading the content wasn’t possible because the ad interrupted that process. We solved that problem in JW 8.1 by loading the video content while the ad is played, which resulted in 75% of plays starting up in less than a second, if not instantaneously.

 

 

In short, we can reduce buffering of video content when there are no ads and when running content after ads. There is however still a large gap in a buffer-free experience given that many of our customers run preroll ads. Content may start and resume quickly, but there’s still the dreaded ad buffering that happens first, and can lead to user drop-off before content starts as well as overall user pain.

Ad preloading takes the last major step toward a truly Buffer-Free player by making ad requests in advance of user-initiated playback, whether it be via clicking play or scrolling the player into view so that it autostarts. By doing so, the ad is fetched from the ad server early, even traversing wrappers and redirects that typically add extra buffering. By the time the user initiates playback, the ad is ready to go, cutting buffering time in half.

 

 

 

 

While there are some caveats to ad preloading as noted in our support documentation, such as not being able to preload VPAID ads, and not being able to preload when the player autostarts in view, it is undeniable that the reduction in buffering time is visually impressive in low-bandwidth situations.

 

 

Player example end

The difference in a preloaded ad experience vs. one that wasn’t preloaded.

 

Ad preloading won’t be perfect for every use case, but it goes a long way in improving the user experience of your site and encouraging viewers to both stay on your site and come back in the future.

We are very excited to offer this new functionality, and feedback has been great in the early stages since release. We encourage you to have a conversation with your ad server about ad preloading and the logistics around reporting on preloaded ads, then turn the functionality on via your dashboard for a great improvement in user engagement.

 

To learn more about JW Player’s Buffer-Free Player, schedule time to speak with a video expert.

 

Contact Us

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12 Takeaways from JW Insights 2018

What we learned about digital video at JW Player’s 5th annual conference

At JW Insights 2018, we explored everything from video intelligence and machine learning to monetization strategies and actionable analytics. It was a very full day of discussions with 300+ industry registrants, and we’ve put together 12 key takeaways from some of the best panels, keynotes, and fireside chats. Take a look below.

 

Takeaways from JW Insights

 

1. Test everything and test outside the normal boundaries, so your video business is flexible and ready for inevitable change.

2. One of the major issues in the video ad industry is VAST/VPAID errors, but until VAST 4.0 is widely adopted, we’re stuck with them.

3. Every media brand and video provider should be invested in OTT.

4. Speed is the bedrock of video experience success

5. In the age of GDPR, informed explicit consent is critical.

6. Brand safety and trust in the ad ecosystem are a two-way street for buyers and sellers.

7. Blockchain holds promise but needs to evolve much more for true impact.

8. Data can help content creators optimize distribution, diagnose anomalies, and integrate feedback.

9. Don’t solely rely on YouTube and Facebook to gain viewers — take control of your owned and operated site.

10. Study your video’s performance via metrics, funnel down to what really matters to your business, and incrementally improve.

11. Machine learning will never fully replace human ingenuity but can expedite workflows.

12. Shorter ads might lower CPMs but also grow revenue with additional views.

 

Overheard at JW Player

  • “Killer presentation by Rob Gill. The @Jwplayer 8.4 beta looks like a game changer for load times. great job. #jwinsights #contentlogistics”
  • “If you look at our platform, 65% of the deals being transacted are direct and curated.”
  • “Killer session learning about applying data signals within digital video at #jwinsights”
  • “A great day at JW Insights 2018! An excellent line-up of speakers and moderators. As the media industry continues to transcend into the world of OTT & TVE, we will all benefit from these insights. Already looking forward to next year!”
  • “80% of the internet in 2020 will be video and 10% of all online videos are through JW.”
  • “Video is the future. It was great to hear from content creators, brands, and ad tech folks alike about the importance of video intel and analytics.”

 

Read More

Check out our JW Insights 2018 blog series here, including:

JW Insights 2018 Recap

Video Intelligence: The Next Frontier

 

 

To learn more about how JW Player can support your video business, schedule time to speak with one of our video experts.

 

Contact Us

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Why Aren’t My Ads Playing?

Part 3 of JW Player’s Support Team series on video platform tips, tricks, and best practices

One of the questions we receive the most often is “why are ads not playing in my player?” It is certainly understandable that this is an anxiety-inducing problem, as no ads means no ad revenue. What we find most often is that the player is doing everything correctly, but the ad network is simply not returning an ad for our player to play.

My goal with this blog post is to help you test that our player is doing everything correctly. When you have conversations with your ad networks, you can do so with 100% confidence that our player is not part of the problem. (But if you find that there is an error on our side, we will certainly escalate it to our engineers.)

You can always test your ad tags in our Ads Tester at https://developer.jwplayer.com/tools/ad-tester/

And if you have DFP ad tags, you can use their inspector at https://developers.google.com/interactive-media-ads/docs/sdks/html5/vastinspector

The general rule for DFP tags in our player is this:

  • If the ad plays in Google’s tester, then it should also play in our Ads Tester with the ad client set to Google IMA.
  • If the ad still does not play, try setting VPAID Mode to Enabled in our Ads Tester
  • If the ad still does not play, send it to us so we can test further. And make sure you do not have any geo-blocking or domain restrictions set on your DFP tag.

 

Initial troubleshooting questions / steps

1) What is the ad client and ad tag that you have configured in the player?

2) If you check your browser’s network inspector, filter for the domain name of your ad tag (or another part of the URL). Are you seeing the request for the ad tag?

Here is a screenshot showing how I filter in Chrome for DFP ad tags. I filter for “gampad” (don’t ask me why, but it has always worked for me, so it stuck. I would love it if someone from Google could tell me where the name gampad came from…)

3) What is the response from your ad network?

You are probably going to see one of four things in the response from the ad network:

  • The normal VAST response that contains an ad for us to play
  • A normal VAST response, but the ad creative is not a video, but rather a VPAID Javascript file
  • A wrapped ad, which I think of as a redirect
  • An empty ad response. We get something from the ad network but they do not have an ad for us to play.

Ad Network Responses

I do not want to confuse you with the specifics, but here is a sample response for each type:

 

1) VAST response with a video ad creative:

[code]

<VAST xmlns:xsi=”//www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance” version=”2.0″ xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation=”vast.xsd”>

<Ad id=”232859236″>

<InLine>

<AdSystem version=”2.0″>Alex_Vast</AdSystem>

<AdTitle/>

<Description/>

<Survey/>

<Impression id=”DART”>

<![CDATA[ //qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?2 ]]>

</Impression>

<Creatives>

<Creative sequence=”1″ AdID=””>

<Linear>

<Duration>00:00:30</Duration>

<TrackingEvents>

<Tracking event=”start”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?1</Tracking>

<Tracking event=”impression”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?2</Tracking>

<Tracking event=”firstQuartile”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?3</Tracking>

<Tracking event=”midpoint”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?4</Tracking>

<Tracking event=”thirdQuartile”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?5</Tracking>

<Tracking event=”complete”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?6</Tracking>

<Tracking event=”pause”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?7</Tracking>

<Tracking event=”mute”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?8</Tracking>

<Tracking event=”fullscreen”>//qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?9</Tracking>

</TrackingEvents>

<AdParameters/>

<VideoClicks>

<ClickThrough>

<![CDATA[ //www.jwplayer.com/ ]]>

</ClickThrough>

<ClickTracking id=”Alex”>

<![CDATA[ //qa.jwplayer.com/~alex/pixel.gif?10 ]]>

</ClickTracking>

</VideoClicks>

<MediaFiles>

<MediaFile id=”1″ delivery=”progressive” type=”video/mp4″ bitrate=”0″ width=”640″ height=”360″>

<![CDATA[

//content.jwplatform.com/videos/AEhg3fFb-bPwArWA4.mp4

]]>

</MediaFile>

</MediaFiles>

[/code]

 

If you see a <Creatives> section in the response. Hopefully there is a <MediaFiles> section. Check the type=” ” or the URL of the media file. If it ends in .mp4 then you have a normal VAST response. This ad should play in all browsers. Some ad networks will give you a .webm video, but these will play in Chrome or Firefox only.

 

2) VPAID response

[code]

<MediaFiles>

<MediaFile delivery=”progressive” type=”application/javascript” width=”960″ height=”540″ apiFramework=”VPAID”>

https://adnetwork.com/ads/vpaid.js

</MediaFile>

</MediaFiles>

[/code]

 

If you notice the MediaFile is Javascript or a .js file, then you have a VPAID response. Please see my notes on VPAID ad creatives down below.

 

3) Wrapped ad tag

[code]

<VAST xmlns:xsi=”http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance” xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation=”vast.xsd” version=”3.0″>

<Ad id=”710743816″>

<Wrapper>

<AdSystem>GDFP</AdSystem>

<VASTAdTagURI>

<![CDATA[

https://pubads.g.doubleclick.net/gampad/ads?sz=640×480&iu=/124319096/external/utility_samples&ciu_szs=300×250&impl=s&gdfp_req=1&env=vp&output=xml_vast2&unviewed_position_start=1&cust_params=sample_ct%3Dredirectlinear&correlator=1292672814

]]>

</VASTAdTagURI>

[/code]

 

Notice the <Wrapper> tag on the third line. This means that the ad network response points to a new ad tag in the <VASTAdTagURI> section. What does this mean for your viewer? It means they have to wait for another file to be requested and to load, which means a longer wait for the ad to start. Hopefully the new tag we load will play an ad, but it could also return another wrapped ad tag redirect…

 

4) Empty ad response

This can look a few different ways:

[code]

<VAST xmlns:xsi=”http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance” xsi:noNamespaceSchemaLocation=”vast.xsd” version=”3.0″/>

[/code]

 

or

 

[code]

<vast></vast>

[/code]

 

Essentially there are only a few lines in the response. From a technical standpoint, an empty response is a perfectly valid scenario. It tells us the ad network received the request but they chose to respond without an ad. It is unfortunate that this is the case, but at least you know the player is doing everything correctly. My first suggestion would be to ask your ad network what you can do to increase your ad fill.

 

What is the problem with VPAID Javascript responses?

First of all, VPAID is great when it works and the ads play.

But the problem when the ads do not play is that it is almost impossible for us to see what went wrong. And keep in mind that when our player loads a VPAID Javascript file from your ad network, they have complete control over the viewer experience. By everything, I mean the volume, is the ad muted, are there controls to pause or mute the ad, does that one VPAID ad go out and try to load other VPAID ads and make the viewer wait? All of these are controlled by your ad network, and we can only sit there and wait for them to tell us the ad is over.

 

So what can you do to troubleshoot?

My first suggestion is to ask your ad network for sample ad tags that fill 100% of the time for testing. If they cannot give you one, then I do not think they are being a good partner. They should prove to you that their technology works too, right?

DFP has sample ad tags at https://developers.google.com/interactive-media-ads/docs/sdks/html5/tags

SpotX will build you a sample ad tag at https://www.spotx.tv/tag-generator-src/TagGenerator.html

  1. Choose the laptop
  2. Choose “yes I do!’
  3. Choose “directly into my player”
  4. Choose “VPAID 2.0”
  5. Choose JW Player

We also have a few sample tags too:

https://playertest.longtailvideo.com/vast-30s-ad.xml

http://playertest.longtailvideo.com/vpaid-2-linear-v1.xml

 

As mentioned earlier, you can always test your ad tags in our Ads Tester at https://developer.jwplayer.com/tools/ad-tester/

 

Hope this is useful. Please let me know how else I can help,

Todd

Director, Technical Support Team

todd@jwplayer.com

 

For more posts from the Support Team series, click here.

 

To learn more about improving the performance of your video ads, schedule time to speak with a video expert.

 

Contact Us

 

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Depending Only on YouTube for Ad Revenue Is Risky

Perspectives on the digital video world from JW Player’s SVP of Technology

Imagine that you operate a YouTube channel with over 8 million subscribers. This would rank you among the top 500 publishers on YouTube, which means your content would be wildly popular, far surpassing the viewership most cable networks, especially among the coveted 18-24 year-old male demographic. Surprisingly, the ad revenue from your channel doesn’t make you obscenely rich, but it provides a nice living, as they say, for you and the small staff of millennials you pay to create the videos.

You’d also imagine that your army of fans would make you popular with YouTube itself, since they are taking up to 45% of your copious ad revenue.

You would be wrong.

In fact, you might start to think that YouTube actively dislikes your channel, because they start “de-monetizing” your videos, citing vague violations of their “advertiser-friendly content guidelines,” like this one from December 2017.

YouTube isn’t deleting your videos, mind you—just your ability to make any money from them.

As result, your revenue plummets, taking with it your nice living but more urgently your ability to pay your millenial creators, which means fewer videos, which means even less revenue, which means a potential death spiral for your business.

This is basically what happened to Explosm, makers of the popular but controversial “Cyanide and Happiness” webcomic. In response, Explosm has started a Patreon community in the hopes that donations from fans will make up for the lost revenue. It will be interesting to see if they are successful.

It is another example of how risky it has become for even the largest video creators to rely solely on platforms like YouTube for their revenue (back in January my colleague Bill Day wrote about similar impact Facebook has had). Even a minor change in their terms of service can take a creator from blockbuster to bankruptcy almost overnight.

Creators need to take more control of their own destiny. Thanks to the open web, it is easier and more cost-effective than ever to distribute you own video content and monetize it any way you want.

 

 

Contact Us

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Not All Ad Requests Are Created Equal

Best practices on improving your video monetization from JW Player’s Vice President of Programmatic Strategy

At JW Player, my role as the Vice President of Programmatic Strategy is to help our customers maximize their return on investment as soon as they’ve purchased a license for the player and are gearing up to deploy our technology. This conversation typically kicks off with a discussion about best practices for video and how to optimize ad inventory. The goal is to help publishers drive the highest possible CPM and fill rates from programmatic advertisers.

In this article, I’ll cover some of the most crucial aspects of generating video revenue, leveraging pre-roll placements and Google AdX as the source of monetization.

 

As the online video advertising industry matures, the overarching trend to beware of is the shift towards an “intent to watch” model. Publishers who create a top-notch video viewing experience (in every sense) will be rewarded with premium advertising dollars. Thus, it’s important to measure how users engage with the pre-roll ads on your website.

There are three primary metrics that programmatic video buyers use: TrueView Skip Rate, Completion Rate, and Viewability Rate. As a rule of thumb, you want each metric to be above 60%. The closer to 100% the better.

 

TrueView Skip Rate

TrueView ads are video campaigns that allow the users to skip the ad after five seconds. Skipping is exactly what you want. The more users who click to skip the campaigns, the higher your CPM and fill rate will be. From the advertiser’s perspective, there’s no better measure of user engagement than the guarantee (in the form of a recorded click) that the user has watched at least five seconds of the campaign. The brand, product or service will typically be shown in the beginning of the commercial to accommodate this.

 

If the TrueView Skip Rate is low, it usually means one of two things: either you’re subject to bad traffic or you’ve implemented the player where users aren’t focusing their attention, such as in the sidebar of the page layout.

 

To increase your TrueView Skip Rate, make sure that the JW Player is the primary focus of the page, especially if you’re going to use autostart placements, such as on YouTube-style pages. However, note that user-initiated players always perform better than autostart players, since advertisers will know that the user has already engaged with the player.

 

Bonus tip #1 – When scheduling an AdX video creative, I recommend setting the max duration–90 seconds for skippable campaigns and 30 seconds for non-skippable campaigns. This will maximize eligible demand for your inventory.

Completion Rate

For non-skippable campaigns, the most critical metric is Completion Rate, which measures how many users watch the video ad till the end. This is where the quality of your content comes into play: A user is more likely to watch the entire commercial if there’s real desire to get to the video.

 

If your Completion Rate is low and the player has been implemented at the top of the page, have a look at Google Analytics to see how long your users are staying on the page. If they leave too quickly, it’s a sign the video content isn’t engaging enough, leaving video ads without a chance to finish.

 

Bonus tip #2 – Finding the right placement for your player can be a trial-and-error process. Every website is different, and I recommend that publishers embed players in multiple positions on the page and measure the performance for each by segmenting the inventory.

 

If your Completion Rate is low and the player has been implemented at the bottom of the page, verify users aren’t navigating away from the page as soon as the player begins playback. In addition, make sure the viewer intends to watch the video. This is particularly important with autostart placements. To be blunt about it: Don’t embed a video for the sake of embedding a video. Make sure that the embedded video is relevant to the article.

 

Viewability Rate

For video ads to make an impact, they ultimately need to be seen by users. The metric used here is called Viewability. The ad impression is deemed “viewable” when 50% of the ad (at the very least) is viewed for a minimum of 2 seconds. As with display campaigns, there’s direct correlation between Viewability and CPM. Advertisers won’t buy impressions on your site if the ads aren’t being viewed by anyone.

 

User-initiated players tend to record higher Viewability rates. Larger players are also more likely to be seen by the user. Therefore, I recommend setting the player size to a responsive dimension such as 16:9 and then making sure that the parent div container of the embed is as wide as possible especially on mobile to occupy the maximum amount of real estate.

 

Bonus tip #3 – Many publishers are subject to Multiburn on their pages. This means that multiple players from multiple companies are playing (and autostarting) at the same time. This is a very common reason for CPM and fill rate being low even though Skip, Completion, and Viewability rates are good. In a nutshell, more video plays (and impressions) don’t necessarily equal more revenue, and it’s important to ensure quality over quantity when managing your inventory.  You don’t want to dilute the quality of your inventory.

 

Low viewability rates are common if users on your page scroll away from the player as soon as it loads. With JW Player 8, you can enable autostart on-view, but this setting is only effective if the page loads quickly and there are no third-party widgets or display ads hovering above it.

 

If your Viewability rate is low and the player has been implemented in a sticky position, there’s most likely a technical issue. Contact our support team to have a look at the implementation. That said, it’s important to recognize that while sticky players are good for increasing Viewability rates, they usually fall short on all the other engagement metrics.

How to measure your own performance

To measure how your own website stacks up in Google DFP, please follow the instructions in the images below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To learn more about improving your monetization opportunities, schedule time to speak with a video expert.

 

Contact Us

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“Where’s the ROI?”

Walking your C-Suite boss through video advertising’s biggest misconception

If you’re in charge of a publisher’s video content program, few events can cause more anxiety than a meeting with the C-Suite when you’re first getting your initiative off the ground.

You’ve assembled a great team, produced dozens of quality videos, and worked late into the night on your carefully crafted distribution strategy. The only problem? Your new video program hasn’t quite delivered the ROI your company was expecting yet. And now it’s up to you to explain why your company should continue devoting resources to it.

Debunking the greatest myth about video

While some executives have the misconception that video doesn’t produce a strong enough ROI, the truth is video can be very lucrative.

As any publisher knows, quality video content costs much more to produce than a written article or slideshow. But the long-term payoffs can be substantial. The Interactive Advertising Bureau predicts that U.S. advertisers will spend $14.5 billion on digital video in 2018, with this number climbing to more than $23 billion by 2021. Publishers who are able to break into the over-the-top (OTT) television market will have an opportunity to reap even greater rewards, with ad revenues in this space expected to top $30 billion in 2018.

In addition to highlighting these facts in your C-Suite meeting, consider bringing success stories of how media giants have integrated video into their businesses. Hearst, which generated 15 billion video views last year, just recently opened a new, 26,000 square-foot production studio dedicated to video. Firms like Vice Media have built multi-billion dollar companies on the back of a strong digital video operation. Though Vice began as a niche punk-rock print magazine in 1994, the publisher’s early bet on original video and branded content have helped it grow into the household name it is today.

For more examples, our resources page features case studies that can support your conversations with the C-Suite.

Why does this misconception about video exist?

New video publishers frequently struggle not because they lack quality content with high ROI potential, but because they aren’t showcasing or monetizing their work the right way.

For instance, if not enough people are engaging with videos on your site, your problem might be that you’re not A/B testing your headlines and thumbnails. If your visitors are leaving quickly after they arrive on the page, you might want to speed up your site load times. If people aren’t interacting with ads, a more strategic approach that invests in the lifetime value of the customer may be in order.

Monetization can further be hindered by the fact that, until recently, a great deal of video viewing has taken place on outside platforms like Facebook and YouTube, which generate lower CPMs for publishers and force them to split their revenues with another company.

Facebook’s latest algorithm changes have dramatically reduced social traffic to branded videos, meaning publishers can make an even greater case to their C-Suite boss: The time has never been better to use their owned and operated site as the main source of video monetization.

How JW Player can help

Here at JW Player, video monetization is what we do. Our ad technology is compatible with all major ad servers, networks, and exchanges, and our latest partnership with SpotX further allows publishers to simultaneously access multiple demand sources via video player bidding. We also offer consultative services on optimizing your ad yield. Best of all, you won’t have to worry about a revenue split diluting your ROI, as our customers keep 100% of their ad revenues.

So relax, take a deep breath, and know that help is on the way. We’ve proven time and again that video advertising can deliver major ROI for a wide range of video publishers. There’s no reason for your
C-Suite boss to believe your firm will be any different.

 

Ready to boost your video ad revenue? Schedule time to speak with a video expert.

 

Contact Us

 

The post “Where’s the ROI?” appeared first on JW Player.

How to Get Started with Video Player Bidding

Integrate header bidding into your player with just one click

Until now, the potential of header bidding for video has been limited by difficult implementation and a fragmented marketplace. Video Player Bidding is a market-changing solution built for video to reduce latency and boost monetization with just one click. We’re here to help you onboard.

It’s Finally Here!

Header bidding has been an industry standard in display for a few years, but video header bidding is still cutting-edge. While video header bidding unlocks more ad revenue via increased fill rate and higher CPMs, it comes with many hurdles that most publishers haven’t been able to overcome.

 

JW Player recognized the market challenges and the incredible benefits of video advertising and knew that partnering with a top tier advertising technology company was the solution. After much due diligence, JW Player chose to team up with SpotX to offer the best integration to publishers. SpotX is a video ad serving platform that offers programmatic infrastructure for premium media owners & publishers, providing them with access to 65+ demand sources with reduced latency.

 

Now with JW8 (which is great by the way), you can finally turn on Video Player Bidding powered by SpotX with one click!

Why It Matters

Video header bidding is fragmented and difficult to implement at scale. The process is complex, requiring a lot of custom coding that can slow down your entire page as well as a fair amount of control over the page where you’re running video. If you’re motivated, it’s doable but not ideal.

 

As a publisher, you want more control over how advertisers are programmatically bidding on your video inventory. Header bidding boosts ad revenue via increased fill rates and higher CPMs, as well as provides the desired control, but there is no easy solution that leads to fast bids and ads. On the other side of the table, advertisers want more access to quality video inventory. JW Player’s Video Player Bidding is the first solution that gives both sides the control they’ve been seeking.

 

Through the integration built directly into JW Player, you can provide buyers access to player settings, content settings, and viewability data, which increase the value of your inventory. This all happens before the user clicks the player. That means no extra buffering before the ad loads and increased viewer retention.

 

Why It’s Hard

Whether you’re just starting with video header bidding or are working on integrating your fifth bidder, any integration takes some work to get set up. In the past you would need to load a script in the page header, request a bid from the bidder, wait for the response, then proceed down the path from there. This can require 100 lines of code or more on the page with multiple network requests — and all of this overhead creates latency and slows the page down!

 

Welcome to Video Player Bidding

By integrating SpotX and header bidding directly into the player, we’ve reduced a complex workflow with lots of Javascript to just one click in your JW Player dashboard:

 

Alternatively, you can use just a few lines of code in the player configuration:

 

What this means is that if you’re already running video ads with JW Player, turning on video player bidding could be as simple as one click in our dashboard. The ease of implementation is by far the biggest benefit.

Beyond the simplicity, working with one bidder like SpotX means minimal added page latency. By not requiring additional code in the header, your page load time and player setup time remain low. As we’ve evangelized in the past, and have continued to do so, this is incredibly important for user experience.

 

How Do I Get Started?

As you’d expect, the process is simple. We’ll break down your next steps:

  1. Already running ads via JW Player and have a relationship with SpotX
    • Reach out to your SpotX rep for information. You’re just a few clicks away!
    • Check out our Getting Started Guide for more details
  2. Already running ads via JW Player but aren’t yet working with SpotX
    • Visit this link to get in touch with SpotX to get started
    • SpotX will guide you through the onboarding process
    • Check out our Getting Started Guide if you have any concerns or reach out to your JW Player account manager
    • You’re good to go!
  3. Not yet a JW Player customer but have a relationship with SpotX
    • We’d love to hear from you!
    • Getting up and running with JW Player takes no time at all. If you’re migrating from another player, we’re happy to consult on the migration process
    • Once you’ve got video ads running with JW Player, turning on video player bidding is just a click away!
  4. I don’t currently work with JW Player or SpotX but I sure want to!
    • We’re excited to work with you too! Reach out to JW Player, and we’ll get you in touch with the right people and get your video ads running ASAP

 

To learn more about getting started with Video Player Bidding, schedule time to talk with one of our video experts.

 

Contact Us

The post How to Get Started with Video Player Bidding appeared first on JW Player.