REVIEW: Freefly Movi Makes Your Smartphone Videos Smoother—But it Takes Practice

Does Freefly's smartphone stabilizer live up to its formidable predecessor's reputation?

Freefly’s new Movi is inspired by—but not to be confused with—the go-to industry gimbal MōVI Pro. Freefly claims that it has taken all of the “professional filmmaking tricks” and tech developed for the full-sized stabilizer and packed it into a simple “cinema robot” to take your mobile phone filmmaking up a notch with professional stabilization.

We decided to give the unit a whirl in some common field situations such as moving through an active environment, driving shots, and landscape pans. Rigging up an iPhoneX on a loaner unit from Freefly (Only iOS is currently supported but Android support is on the way), we found that the Movi could help us get some beautiful shots, but was not necessarily as simple and intuitive to use as the company would have us believe. Check out some of our impressions and test results below.

Balancing the phone in the Movi was the first snag we hit where it became apparent that the “simple, on the go” use wasn’t going to be as seamless as promised.

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Why Martin Scorsese’s ‘Raging Bull’ Inspired Robert Schwentke to Shoot ‘The Captain’ in Black and White

Hollywood director Robert Schwentke doesn't care whether audiences like 'The Captain,' his first indie film.

You may recognize Robert Schwentke's name from Hollywood blockbusters such as the Insurgent franchise, RED, or The Time Traveler's Wife. But you won't recognize any elements of those films in The Captain. Schwentke's first independent effort is a singular vision—one that decidedly eschews convention. Taking a cerebral approach to a nearly untouchable subject, Schwentke's film is a challenging watch. If audiences don't like it? Well, that's no concern of his. Indeed, it is all part of the design.

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3 Reasons Why You Should Absolutely Get Your Hands on a Nifty Fifty

If you haven't purchased a 50mm lens yet, here's why you might want to.

When new filmmakers buy their first camera, they typically go with a kit lens that gives them some flexibility in the focal length department, allowing them to zoom in and out to get the right shot. And while gear acquisition may not be the prime directive when first starting out, there is one additional piece of equipment that newbies might really want to consider getting their hands on: a good ol' nifty fifty. In this video, David Bergman of Adorama TV explains several of the main benefits of working with a 50mm lens. Check it out below:

They're small and lightweight

A huge benefit of using these lenses, especially for those who aren't used to carting around a bulky camera, is that they're small and lightweight. You're not shooting on a long, heavy, unwieldy zoom lens that you have to carry around all day, you're shooting on a relatively short and compact lens that doesn't bulldoze its way into your work.

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Watch: Is This the Best Sounding Short of All Time?

These two sound recordists have one extremely relatable mission.

The life of a post-production freelancer is tough. Whether you're an editor, a colorist, a VFX artist, or a sound designer, chances are you're going to have someone who's in charge ask you to finish your work earlier than agreed upon (inevitably only to pay you later than promised). For the sound recordist who labors not only in the studio but out in the field to provide a film with the unique quality the director requires, that work is often underappreciated.

We all know how important good sound is to a film, so why isn't it a more "glamorous" occupation? Maybe it's because quality sound work inherently goes unnoticed by the audience? The filmmakers behind Death of the Sound Man were determined to find out. Whatever the reason, Sorayos Prapapan goes to great lengths in this short to find the answer.

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Hans Zimmer on How to Be a Composer with ‘No Technique and No Formal Education’

Hans Zimmer, the legendary Academy-Award winning composer of over 150 films, breaks down his most famous work.

[Editor's Note: Although it may appear that the same video is being featured several times throughout this article, we've actually set each specific one to the timecode of when Zimmer brings up an example of a particular movie. While the video's thumbnail may appear the same for each, click play and you will be taken to a specific portion of the lengthy conversation].

During the course of Hans Zimmer's career, the German-born composer has worked with directors from Christopher Nolan to Terrence Malick, and composed scores in every conceivable genre, from animated films (The Lion King, for which he won an Oscar for Best Original Score) to action movies (Crimson Tide) and blockbusters like The Dark Knight trilogy.

Earlier this month, during a talk presented by BAFTA at the Royal Albert Hall in London, Zimmer sat down with Tommy Pearson to look at clips from some of his most famous films and share some insights from his four decades in film.

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Watch: Is This the Best Sounding Short of All Time?

These two sound recordists have one extremely relatable mission.

The life of a post-production freelancer is tough. Whether you're an editor, a colorist, a VFX artist, or a sound designer chances are you're going to have someone who's in charge ask you to finish your work earlier than agreed, inevitably only to pay you later than promised. For the sound recordist, who labors not only in the studio, but out in the field to provide a film with the unique quality the director requires, that work is often underappreciated.

We all know how important good sound is to a film, so why isn't it a more "glamorous" occupation? That's what the filmmakers behind Death of the Sound Man endeavor to find out. Maybe it's because quality sound work inherently goes unnoticed by the audience. Whatever the reason, Sorayos Prapapan goes to great lengths in this short to find the answer.

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Win $100K in Prizes & Gear in Aputure’s ‘Light This Location’ Contest

Create a film made within a single location for a chance to win big prizes from Aputure.

Aputure has been making a name for itself in the production space with its low cost, high quality LED fixtures and other useful gadgets. Now the company is teaming up with Blackmagic Design, SmallHD, Quasar Science, Freefly and more to bring you a contest with some impressive prizes. All you need to do to enter is make a short film on any topic in a single location and create an accompanying one-to-two minute behind-the-scenes video, plus a floor plan outlining your lighting setups.

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Are you a Filmmaker Who’s 18 Years Old or Younger? Here are 18 Great Film Festivals For You

You're only a teenage filmmaker once. Why not apply to some film festivals with opportunities just for you?

Getting through high school, getting a driver's license, finding a summer job—if you're a young filmmaker, you've probably got a lot on your mind! If you're passionate about filmmaking and have a film to show for yourself, why not get a leg up and screen your work in festivals dedicated to your age group?

Film festivals can be a confusing bag for people at any age. Why should you take the time to apply to a film festival?

Your festival submission should, in theory, be tied to one of these potential goals, depending on what the festival offers: exposure of your work at a festival that has industry credibility, to meet other filmmakers and film champions, to win some cash prizes, or to get those "official selection" festival laurels that can look good on your movie poster or resume.

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What it Takes to Be a Top TV Editor

Two Emmy-nominated editors break down how to make it in the TV business.

The "Age of Peak TV" is a phrase thrown around so much it’s starting to feel like a cliché, but the fact is that there's more programming being created for more platforms than ever before, which means that there's more work for people in the film and TV business, particularly in one crucial part of the process: post-production. But just how do you break into post-production for TV, what can you expect once you do, and what does it take to be a really good television editor?

To find out, I spoke with two of the best: A.M. Peters and Tennille Uithof, each of who received an Emmy nomination this year for their work on Queer Eye and Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, respectively. Peters is a director and producer who has more than 25 TV series editing credits under her belt and Uithof has been in the TV editing game for almost 20 years and has worked on some of the most popular reality and docuseries like Wife Swap and American Pickers.

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Learn How to Fight on Camera from a Pro Who Got Punched by Chuck Norris

This professional stuntman survived a blow from the Texas Ranger himself to pass on his secrets to you.

Fight scenes might be some of the most exciting to watch, but they're also some of the most complicated to shoot. Capturing a fight for a film requires a lot of carefully executed techniques in order to make it exhilarating, realistic, and safe for all involved. In this video from Shutterstock, stunt coordinator John Cann, who totally got to brawl with Chuck Norris on camera, goes over a few tricks of the trade to show you how to choreograph a realistic and action-packed fight scene. Check it out below:

The video goes over a bunch of important elements of a fight scene, including how to sell a punch, how to choke someone safely, how to throw and toss someone, and different props you can use to bash your enemies good. Here are a few things Cann says will make a fight scene both believable and safe.

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